News

From forests-to-flight: Decarbonizing the aviation sector
The International Panel on Climate Change has postulated that, if left unchecked, we will likely see a 3.7 to 4.8°C increase in the Earth’s surface temperature by the end of the century. This temperature increase is likely to result in very disruptive and expensive events, such as rising sea-levels and extreme storms. Growing more trees, capturing CO2 and finding alternative, renewable sources of energy are all ways to help mitigate this temperature rise.


Mapping plant invasions in an urban area using remote sensing
The occurrence of invasive plants is increasing in all types of ecosystems, producing both positive and negative changes on the landscape. Many land managers aim to decrease the negative effects that plant invasions bring, which may require curbing their spread through proactive management.


Why Thermal Imaging Can Inspire Home Retrofits
Being able to see where heat is escaping from your own home is a powerful—and underutilized—way to encourage home energy retrofits, especially when those infrared images are packaged with other incentives and promoted within your community. That’s a key finding that researchers want energy efficiency promoters across Canada to know. Some 63 per cent of energy use in Canadian homes is from space heating, so heat loss is expensive and wasteful.


Sally Aitken receives Genome Canada and Genome BC funding
Dr. Sally Aitken is leading a team that will use genomics to test the ability of trees from different populations to resist heat, cold, drought and disease, and identify the genes and genetic variation involved in climate adaptation.


Scott Hinch receives NSERC Strategic Grant
Scott Hinch was awarded a NSERC Strategic grant totaling $590,000 for research into the effects of injury , pathogens, and climate warming on migration and spawning success of Pacific salmon that have escaped from fishing gear. Partner organizations include the Canadian Dept. Fisheries and Oceans, Pacific Salmon Commission, and Pacific Salmon Foundation.


New Master of Geomatics for Environmental Management program
The UBC Faculty of Forestry is excited to announce that the official approval of the Master of Geomatics for Environmental Management (MGEM) Program. We are now accepting applications and will welcome our first cohort in August, 2017.


Richard Hamelin receives Genome Canada and Genome BC funding
Dr. Richard Hamelin will co-lead a team of scientists to harness the power of biosurveillance by decoding the genomes of some of the most threatening invasive species and developing a new suite of tools to rapidly and accurately detect these detrimental forest enemies and assess the risk they pose.


Bill Reid’s Looplex X in the Forest Sciences Atrium
After years of planning and preparation, and with permission from the First Nations House of Learning, the Musqueam people, and the Haida people, Bill Reid’s Looplex X has finally found a home in the Forest Sciences Centre.


Joerg Bohlmann receives Genome Canada and Genome BC funding
Spruce trees are Canada’s most significant forest resource because they grow in almost every region across the country and are the largest species by the number. Spruce trees also produce high quality wood and fibre that is widely used in the industry. With roughly 400 million seedlings planted per year, spruce are the most reforested trees in Canada. Climate change and unpredictable forest product markets require innovative new tools and technologies for tree breeding programs to deliver reliable spruce stock for future seed and seedling production.


Lab Tours: Social-Ecological Systems Research Group
The SES research group is housed in the Faculty of Forestry at the University of British Columbia. We conduct problem-focused research that is motivated by the perspective that social science insights provide essential contributions for understanding and developing solutions for challenges such as adapting to climate change, minimizing biodiversity and forest loss, and fostering sustainable, self-determined livelihoods.