Research

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In the 2015/2016 fiscal year, members of the Faculty Forestry were awarded a total of $9.4 million in research funding and authored 200 articles in 122 peer-reviewed journals. Read more about our research in our Annual Report.

Our wide breadth of research includes topics such as tree rings, integrated remote sensing, bioenergy, forest conservation genetics, landscape visualizations, African forest conservation & development, alpine studies, advanced wood processing.

Learn about all our research topics in our groups & projects section, or browse our Faculty by research interests.

Recent Research Highlights

Sally Aitken receives Genome Canada and Genome BC funding
Dr. Sally Aitken is leading a team that will use genomics to test the ability of trees from different populations to resist heat, cold, drought and disease, and identify the genes and genetic variation involved in climate adaptation.


Scott Hinch receives NSERC Strategic Grant
Scott Hinch was awarded a NSERC Strategic grant totaling $590,000 for research into the effects of injury , pathogens, and climate warming on migration and spawning success of Pacific salmon that have escaped from fishing gear. Partner organizations include the Canadian Dept. Fisheries and Oceans, Pacific Salmon Commission, and Pacific Salmon Foundation.


Richard Hamelin receives Genome Canada and Genome BC funding
Dr. Richard Hamelin will co-lead a team of scientists to harness the power of biosurveillance by decoding the genomes of some of the most threatening invasive species and developing a new suite of tools to rapidly and accurately detect these detrimental forest enemies and assess the risk they pose.


Joerg Bohlmann receives Genome Canada and Genome BC funding
Spruce trees are Canada’s most significant forest resource because they grow in almost every region across the country and are the largest species by the number. Spruce trees also produce high quality wood and fibre that is widely used in the industry. With roughly 400 million seedlings planted per year, spruce are the most reforested trees in Canada. Climate change and unpredictable forest product markets require innovative new tools and technologies for tree breeding programs to deliver reliable spruce stock for future seed and seedling production.